Diversities and Genders

This theme highlights exclusionary processes at play at World Heritage sites, as well as to highlight new and innovative approaches to address them. This theme is essential at the times of the Black Lives Matter Movement, hyper-diversified societies and the increased injustices created along (intersections of) race, gender and class by Covid-19. The objectives of this theme are:
– To reveal how structural inequalities and unequal power relations, particularly between the North and the Global South, reflected in nations, structure the World Heritage system and marginalised communities, groups and individuals.
– To explore mechanisms of domination, discrimination, exclusion and erasure of women and minorities through heritage policies and practices (folklorization, forgetting of specific narratives).
– To highlight how marginalised communities, groups and individuals, as well as multiple and shifting forms of identities can be better represented in narratives on World Heritage
– To (re)consider processes of heritage valuation and benefits that have led to the marginalisation of forms of heritages and minority stakeholders.
– To highlight key and contemporary issues affecting minority groups, communities and individuals (including women) at World Heritage sites, particularly relating to the Sustainable Development Goals, and innovative approaches to address them.

PAST EVENTS (AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE!)

WEBINAR #1: Marginalisation and minoritisation: domination, discrimination, exclusion and erasure >>
WEBINAR #2: Colonial Legacies of gender and sexuality>>
WEBINAR #3: Local Learning: everyday activism, everyday resistances – WHAT CAN I DO? >>
WEBINAR #4: Institutional Inequalities: unequal power relations >>
CONFERENCE PANEL I: MONUMENTS OF OPPRESSION >>
CONFERENCE PANEL II: OPPRESSION FROM MONUMENTS >>
CONFERENCE PANEL III: ACKNOWLEDGING INTANGIBLE HERITAGE AS PART OF FUTURE HERITAGE PAST
>>
CONFERENCE PANEL IV: CARING FOR FUTURE WORLDS? SDG’s WITHIN SPACES AND PLACES OF HERITAGE >>

ORGANISERS

Sophia Labadi, Coordinator

Sophia Labadi, Coordinator

University of Kent (United Kingdom)

Professor Sophia Labadi’s academic background includes degrees in Heritage Studies (PhD and MA) and Political Sciences (BA). She is currently an AHRC Leadership Fellow (2019-2020), researching why heritage was marginalised from the Sustainable Development Goals. Much of Sophia's research has focused on how heritage sites and museums can address some of the most pressing global challenges, including social justice, gender equality or sustainable development. Her research is nourished by her previous experiences as consultant for international organisations.

Tokie Laotan-Brown, Co-Convener

Tokie Laotan-Brown, Co-Convener

Dr Tokie Laotan-Brown, Merging Ecologies, ISCCL, ICOMOS Nigeria Heritage Architect & Cultural Economist Consultant

Dr. Tokie Laotan-Brown works as a heritage architect and cultural economist with Merging Ecologies. She is an Executive Committee Member for the Association Critical Heritage Studies; an associate member of the International Network of Traditional Building Architecture & Urbanism (INTBAU); the expert voting member of the ICOMOS-IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes (ISCCL) – representing Nigeria and Ireland; and a member of the ISCCL Africa Working Group. She holds a joint PhD in economics and techniques in the conservation of architectural and environmental heritage with the University of Nova Gorica and Universita luav di Venezia in Italy.

Loes Veldpaus, Co-Convener

Loes Veldpaus, Co-Convener

University of Newcastle (United Kingdom)

Dr. Loes Veldpaus is a Senior Researcher in the School of Architecture Planning and Landscape, Newcastle University (UK) and a member of the Centre for Heritage. Before, she was an adjunct lecturer and research assistant as the Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University of Technology (NL) where she also obtained her PhD (2015). She is the lead researcher on OpenHeritage (2018-2022), looking at the practices, processes, and policies of adaptive heritage re-use across Europe. The questions driving her research, are around understandings of the political nature of heritage, and what people think heritage is and does. She looks at how principal actors in heritage, planning, and design perceive their own roles and responsibilities, as well as the roles and agencies of the buildings, policies, and practices. Building on these understandings, she uses intersectional feminist thought to explore new theoretical avenues and framings to change practices and reimagine heritage planning.

Marco Acri, Team Member

Marco Acri, Team Member

CHS, University of Nova Gorica, Lecturer, Conservation architect

Marco Acri is conservation architect with academic specialisations in territorial management and educational components of heritage preservation, gained at University IUAV of Venice, Erasmus University of Rotterdam and University of Nova Gorica. His career includes experiences at UNESCO CLT, World Monuments Fund, Mediterranean Institute and Federculture, where he could experience international cooperation for cultural projects. At the University of Nova Gorica he coordinates the international doctoral programme in Cultural Heritage Studies, former Economics and Techniques for the Conservation of the Architectural and Environmental Heritage, jointly established with IUAV. He is presently coordinating the UNG partnership in 2 HORIZONprojects: CLIC, focusing on the principles of circular economy in cultural heritage adaptive reuse, and URBiNAT, dealing with the establishment of healthy corridors to regenerate social urban contexts. His main interests are on the tacit forms of natural and cultural heritage protection, with specific pertinence to traditions and traditional knowledge.

Olufemi Adetunji, Team Member

Olufemi Adetunji, Team Member

University of Newcastle and NERD (Australia)

Olufemi Adetunji is a doctoral researcher in Architecture at the University of Newcastle, Australia and the Coordinator of Team NERD, a social enterprise developing evidence-based solutions for leveraging cultural heritage for sustainable development in Africa. He is a member of ICOMOS both in Australia and Nigeria, and coordinates the Emerging Professionals Working Group (EPWG) of ICOMOS in Nigeria and Africa region. He combines community-based research and social entrepreneurship to make real impacts within communities through the findings of his research. He has published two book chapters and numerous articles in international journals on topics across cultural heritage, climate change adaptation and sustainable development. He holds a bachelor and master degrees from Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria.

Paloma Berggren, Team Member

Paloma Berggren, Team Member

Archaeological Anthropologist, Independent Consultant on Heritage Issues (Sweden)

Paloma is an archaeological anthropologist based in Sweden. Her main research interests include contemporary Archaeology, the politics of display, colonial legacies, uncomfortable heritage, digital heritage and museum practices. Her academic background includes a BA in Anthropology/ Archaeology track, and Master in Prehistoric Archaeology from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, her academic work concentrated studying household archaeology in early settlements. She also holds an M.Sc in Social Anthropology and an M.Sc in South -East Asian Studies (China track) both at Lund University. Her M.Sc. researched the intersections of ethnographic methods and their role in heritage making processes. Paloma has been involved in different community-based archaeological projects in the South American Andes, as well in the subtropical high jungle Yungas. She has extensively worked in rural community development projects with indigenous Guaraní communities from the Bolivian dry forest/Chaco Region and has done additional research in Urban Anthropology in Cuba. Currently, she collaborates as an independent consultant on heritage issues and the gap between the relationships connecting carbon footprint, museum objects and the subjectivities of a carbon-constrained societies.

Emilienne Fernande Bodo, Team Member

Emilienne Fernande Bodo, Team Member

ICOMOS International, ICOMOS Cameroon

Fernande Bodo gained her Master’s Degree in Architecture from the TU Munich in 2017, where she completed her studies with a research project on the legislation of modernist architecture in Africa. Through her thesis she got passionate about postcolonial architecture and its impact on the society in the African context. Her involvement in heritage work was initiated through an internship at the UNESCO Regional Office for Central Africa and later she worked as consultant at the UNESCO World Heritage Centre. She is a founding member of the Cameroonian ICOMOS National Committee, which was established in 2020 amid the COVID 19 pandemic.

Annalisa Bolin, Team Member

Annalisa Bolin, Team Member

Linnaeus University (Sweden)

Annalisa Bolin is a postdoctoral fellow in the UNESCO Chair on Heritage Futures at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Her research focuses on heritage politics, including questions of conflict, development, and repatriation, especially in Rwanda. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from Stanford University, USA.

Merve Demiröz, Team Member

Merve Demiröz, Team Member

Polytechnic and University of Turin (Italy)

Merve Demiröz has recently received a PhD degree in the department of Regional and Urban Studies and Planning (DIST), Polytechnic and University of Turin, Italy. Her research focuses on urban conservation, new approaches in cultural heritage, planning histories and data science for urban projects. She got her B.Sc. in City and Regional Planning and M.Arch. in Conservation of Cultural Heritage at Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey. She completed visiting research periods in Newcastle University, UK and École nationale supérieure d'architecture de Paris-La Villette. She has worked at various conservation and archaeological sites in Turkey and is recently a member of ICOMOS Italian National Committee.

Francesca Giliberto, Team Member

Francesca Giliberto, Team Member

University of Kent (United Kingdom)

Dr. Francesca Giliberto is Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Kent and at the University of Leeds. In the past nine years, she has carried out comparative and interdisciplinary research on cultural heritage and sustainable development as well as on urban heritage conservation and management in the framework of the UNESCO’s Historic Urban Landscape Recommendation, the United Nations Agenda 2030 and the 2015 UNESCO Policy on World Heritage and Sustainable Development. She actively contributes to the work of the ICOMOS Sustainable Development Working Group and has co-organized several international conferences and workshops on her research topics in the UK, France, Argentina, South-Africa, Morocco and Lebanon. Her work purposely aims to have an impact in theory and in practice, to influence decision-making and to foster societal challenges.

Karl Goodwin, Team Member

Karl Goodwin, Team Member

University of Kent (United Kingdom)

Karl has just completed his doctoral degree at the University of Kent. His research examines the representation of diversity in museum and heritage site displays, how it is received by visitors and museum staff, and the ideological influences that have prevented inclusive and anti-racist practices to be engrained into core museal activity. Karl is currently a Sessional Lecturer at Canterbury Christ Church University and on the editorial board for the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Journal.

Maya Ishizawa, Team Member

Maya Ishizawa, Team Member

Architect, free lancer (Peru)

Maya Ishizawa is an architect from Lima, Peru. She received a Master of Media and Governance from Keio University, Japan, and a Ph.D. in Heritage Studies at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, Germany. She worked as a researcher and visiting lecturer at the World Heritage Studies in the University of Tsukuba, Japan (2015-2020) where she designed and coordinated the international capacity building programme developed by the UNESCO Chair on Nature-Culture Linkages in Heritage Conservation for Asia and the Pacific. Her work has focused on the management of cultural landscapes, the understanding of Indigenous and local knowledge, and the exploration of nature-culture approaches to conservation in Peru, Spain, Japan and Rwanda. Currently, she collaborates with the ICCROM-IUCN World Heritage Leadership Programme. She is a member of ICOMOS Perú, and an expert voting member of the ICOMOS/IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes where she serves in the Bureau as Scientific Work Coordinator.

Ammar Kessab, Team Member

Ammar Kessab, Team Member

African Development Bank (AfDB)

Dr Ammar Kessab is a Governance Expert at the African Development Bank (AfDB). He received his PhD in Public Management from HEC Montréal (Canada) and the University of Angers (France). Very involved in the cultural debate in Africa and the Arab region, he published several reports, papers and chapters in books in the fields of cultural policies, culture & development and financial management of cultural organizations. He is member of the Board of Directors of the African Culture Fund (ACF) and founding member of the Trans-Saharan Artistic Mobility Fund. Dr Kessab is Algerian.

John Shorter, Team Member

John Shorter, Team Member

The University of the West Indies (Jamaica)

John Shorter is a historical anthropology graduate student at The University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, Jamaica, specialising in archaeology and cultural heritage. His primary research focus intersects bioarchaeology, and medical history with postcolonial theory to investigate the anatomical impact of exploitative labour regimes on the skeletal remains of enslaved Afro-Caribbean populations and their relationship to popular memory. A 2019 Linnaeus Palme scholar, he is currently an executive board member of the Archaeological Society of Jamaica (ASJ) and a research assistant at The UWI Mona’s Centre for Reparations Research (CRR).

Keya Khandaker, Team Member

Keya Khandaker, Team Member

PhD Candidate, University of Leeds

Keya Khandaker is a PhD candidate at the University of Leeds. Her PhD is conducted in collaboration with the Overseas Development Institute’s GAGE (Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence) programme. Her research interrogates norms that are valued or erased in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with reference to gender norm change and adolescent agency. This research drew from her involvement as a youth advocate with various International NGOs, including Plan International UK and Restless Development. More information can be found at https://essl.leeds.ac.uk/politics/pgr/1250/keya-khandaker .

Toni Smith, Team Member

Toni Smith, Team Member

University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

Toni Smith recently graduated from the University of Birmingham with a PhD in African Studies. Her research focuses on colonial discourses and representations of women, marriage, and slavery. She has examined how systematic, colonial sexual and gender-based violence consolidated Belgian control and power in the Congo. Her work was funded by the Conjugal Slavery in War Partnership: http://csiw-ectg.org/. She completed her master’s degree in African Studies and Anthropology at the University of Birmingham and her bachelor’s degree in Globalisation: History, Politics and Culture at the University of Brighton. Her training was interdisciplinary, and her research interests include histories/legacies of imperialism and exploitation, international law, gender, and feminism.

Affiliated institutes